The Lifelong Sigh of Don Luis Buñuel

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    From age 8 to 15, Luis Buñuel studied at a local Jesuit school that was ruled with iron discipline. It is perhaps little wonder that his mature life and work were informed by a fierce anti-clerical aesthetic and a resistance to institutional authority. In an irony totally in harmony with the director’s ethos, his movies are, nevertheless, suffused with themes of sin and forgiveness, and present sexual obsession and perversion alongside self-flagellating chastity.

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    Parallax View  |  12/1/2016

    Fiore and Prieto Choose Film

    Cinematographer Mauro Fiore on the set of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Pictures and Columbia Pictures' THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN.

    The declining use of film negative, after years of losing ground in feature film production, seems to have leveled off. And using the venerable format is still a viable creative option, especially on bigger productions. Mauro Fiore, ASC worked with film negative in the anamorphic format on his recent western remake The Magnificent Seven. Director Antoine Fuqua

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    The Film Book  |  11/22/2016

    Raoul Coutard, Cinema Revolutionary

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    The great Raoul Coutard died recently, I offer my condolences to his family and friends. Coutard was a seminal figure in world cinema, and influenced an entire generation of cinematographers. I was fortunate to interview Raoul at length on several occasions. The text below is adapted from some of my writings about him. Raoul Coutard

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    The Archers: A Very British Affair

    NPG x87556; Emeric Pressburger; Michael Powell by Cornel Lucas

    It was on Alexander Korda’s The Spy in Black that Michael Powell met Emeric Pressburger. They soon formed The Archers and, beginning with 1942’s One of Our Aircraft Is Missing, made more than one dozen feature films, sharing credit on all of them. Their final collaboration was Night Ambush (1957), a swan song in black-and-white from a team that had elevated color in film to expressionistic — even surrealistic —  heights.

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    The Film Book  |  11/12/2016

    Camerimage 2016 Program

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    Greetings from Bydgoszcz, Poland, where the Camerimage International Film Festival just started. Camerimage is the biggest and best cinematography festival in the world and attracts famous masters, emerging cinematographers, film students and other filmmakers from across the world. Camerimage is a heady mixture of screenings, seminars, workshops and parties. This post gives you a preview

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    Technicolor at 100: No Film, All Digital

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    During Technicolor’s hegemony as the go-to process for accurate color in the movies, more than 500 films were photographed in the 3-strip “Color by Technicolor” process, including many of the greatest triumphs of cinematographers such as Jack Cardiff, Leon Shamroy, Oswald Morris, Harold Rosson and George Folsey. Now a foreign-owned digital business, the company finds itself basking in a purely nostalgic centennial.

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    The Joy of Filmmaking

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    A few weeks ago, a friend in academia asked me for my thoughts on shooting with film cameras rather than on digital video — not to rank one technology over the other, but simply to compare the aesthetic experience of working with each one. Is using film and film cameras onerous work that distracts from the filmmakers’ creative vision because of the format’s inherent limitations? Or does working with the more-than-century-old technology offer unique experiences that are lost in the digital universe?

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